International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education
Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution
APA
In-text citation: (Kazak & Confrey, 2007)
Reference: Kazak, S., & Confrey, J. (2007). Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2(3), 227-244. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/211
AMA
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Kazak S, Confrey J. Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2007;2(3), 227-244. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/211
Chicago
In-text citation: (Kazak and Confrey, 2007)
Reference: Kazak, Sibel, and Jere Confrey. "Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2007 2 no. 3 (2007): 227-244. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/211
Harvard
In-text citation: (Kazak and Confrey, 2007)
Reference: Kazak, S., and Confrey, J. (2007). Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2(3), pp. 227-244. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/211
MLA
In-text citation: (Kazak and Confrey, 2007)
Reference: Kazak, Sibel et al. "Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 2, no. 3, 2007, pp. 227-244. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/211
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Kazak S, Confrey J. Elementary School Students’ Intuitive Conceptions of Random Distribution. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2007;2(3):227-44. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/211

Abstract

This research focuses on fourth-grade (9-year-old) students’ informal and intuitive conceptions of probability and distribution revealed as they worked through a sequence of tasks. These tasks were designed to study students’ spontaneous reasoning about distributions in different settings and their understanding of probability of various binomial random events that they explored with a set of physical chance mechanisms. The data were gathered from a pilot study with four students. We analyzed the interplay of reasoning about distribution and understanding of probability. The findings suggest that students’ qualitative descriptions of distributions could be developed into the quantification of probabilities through reasoning about data in chance situations.

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