International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Natalija B, Lavicza Z, Fenyvesi K, Milinković D. Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2020;15(2), em0569. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/6266
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Natalija et al., 2020)
Reference: Natalija, B., Lavicza, Z., Fenyvesi, K., & Milinković, D. (2020). Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 15(2), em0569. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/6266
Chicago
In-text citation: (Natalija et al., 2020)
Reference: Natalija, Budinski, Zsolt Lavicza, Kristof Fenyvesi, and Dragica Milinković. "Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2020 15 no. 2 (2020): em0569. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/6266
Harvard
In-text citation: (Natalija et al., 2020)
Reference: Natalija, B., Lavicza, Z., Fenyvesi, K., and Milinković, D. (2020). Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 15(2), em0569. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/6266
MLA
In-text citation: (Natalija et al., 2020)
Reference: Natalija, Budinski et al. "Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 15, no. 2, 2020, em0569. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/6266
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Natalija B, Lavicza Z, Fenyvesi K, Milinković D. Developing Primary School Students’ Formal Geometric Definitions Knowledge by Connecting Origami and Technology. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2020;15(2):em0569. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/6266

Abstract

In this paper, we present opportunities with the uses of origami and technology, in our case GeoGebra, in teaching formal geometric definitions for fifth-grade primary school students (11-12yrs). Applying origami in mathematical lessons is becoming to be recognized as a valuable tool for improving students’ mathematical knowledge. In previous studies, we developed origami and technology activities for high-school mathematics, but we wanted to explore if such approach would work in primary school as well. For this reason, we chose a flat origami model оf the crane and we used this model to introduce students to basic geometrical notions and definitions, such as points, lines, intersections of lines and angles. To complement mathematical ideas from paper folding we also employed mathematical software GeoGebra, to further ideas and extend students’ mathematical toolkits. However, to be able to use software, students would already need basic conceptions of geometric definitions and then the use of the software clearly add to solidifying their knowledge. We believe that the combination hands-on activities and technology could contribute to discovery learning and enhancing students’ understanding of geometric definitions and operations.

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