International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Chaphalkar R, Wu K. Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2020;15(2), em0580. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/7602
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Chaphalkar & Wu, 2020)
Reference: Chaphalkar, R., & Wu, K. (2020). Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 15(2), em0580. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/7602
Chicago
In-text citation: (Chaphalkar and Wu, 2020)
Reference: Chaphalkar, Rachel, and Ke Wu. "Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2020 15 no. 2 (2020): em0580. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/7602
Harvard
In-text citation: (Chaphalkar and Wu, 2020)
Reference: Chaphalkar, R., and Wu, K. (2020). Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 15(2), em0580. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/7602
MLA
In-text citation: (Chaphalkar and Wu, 2020)
Reference: Chaphalkar, Rachel et al. "Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 15, no. 2, 2020, em0580. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/7602
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Chaphalkar R, Wu K. Students’ Reasoning about Variability in Graphs during an Introductory Statistics Course. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2020;15(2):em0580. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/7602

Abstract

Variation and variability are key concepts in K-16 statistics education. Prior research has investigated students’ reasoning about variability in different contexts. However, there is a lack of research on students’ development of understanding of variability when comparing distributions in bar graphs, dot plots, and histograms as they took an introductory college-level statistics course. This exploratory case study conducted three interviews with each of the ten participants through a four-month period, at the beginning, middle, and end of the course. The Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) taxonomy was used to analyze participants’ responses. Results indicated that overall the group of participants demonstrated a stable understanding of variability over the semester (i.e. lack of improvement). However, when examining each student’s reasoning, four types of reasoning development paths were found: improvement, lack of change, decline, and inconsistent. This study provides implications in teaching college introductory statistics course and recommendations for future research.

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