International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education
Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals
APA
In-text citation: (Monaghan, 2007)
Reference: Monaghan, J. (2007). Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2(2), 50-71. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/175
AMA
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Monaghan J. Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2007;2(2), 50-71. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/175
Chicago
In-text citation: (Monaghan, 2007)
Reference: Monaghan, John. "Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2007 2 no. 2 (2007): 50-71. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/175
Harvard
In-text citation: (Monaghan, 2007)
Reference: Monaghan, J. (2007). Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2(2), pp. 50-71. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/175
MLA
In-text citation: (Monaghan, 2007)
Reference: Monaghan, John "Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 2, no. 2, 2007, pp. 50-71. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/175
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Monaghan J. Linking School Mathematics to Out-of-School Mathematical Activities: Student Interpretation of Task, Understandings and Goals. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2007;2(2):50-71. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/175

Abstract

This article considers one class of high school students as they worked on a task given to them by a company director of a haulage firm. The article provides details of students’ transformation of the given task into a subtly different task. It is argued that this transformation is interrelated with students’ understandings of mathematics, of technology and of the real world and students’ emerging goals. It is argued that the students did not address the company director’s task. Educational implications with regard to student engagement with realistic tasks are considered..

References

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License

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.