International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education
“It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Hamukwaya ST, Haser Ç. “It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2021;16(1), em0622. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/9569
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Hamukwaya & Haser, 2021)
Reference: Hamukwaya, S. T., & Haser, Ç. (2021). “It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 16(1), em0622. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/9569
Chicago
In-text citation: (Hamukwaya and Haser, 2021)
Reference: Hamukwaya, Shemunyenge Taleiko, and Çiğdem Haser. "“It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2021 16 no. 1 (2021): em0622. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/9569
Harvard
In-text citation: (Hamukwaya and Haser, 2021)
Reference: Hamukwaya, S. T., and Haser, Ç. (2021). “It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 16(1), em0622. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/9569
MLA
In-text citation: (Hamukwaya and Haser, 2021)
Reference: Hamukwaya, Shemunyenge Taleiko et al. "“It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 16, no. 1, 2021, em0622. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/9569
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Hamukwaya ST, Haser Ç. “It does not Mean that They Cannot Do Mathematics”: Beliefs about Mathematics Learning Difficulties. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2021;16(1):em0622. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/9569

Abstract

Namibian preservice high school mathematics teachers’ (N=4) and teacher educators’ (N=3) beliefs about mathematics learning difficulties (MLD) were investigated to document the beliefs developed at the end of the teacher education program, the views and practices that might be emphasized in the program, and possible changes in these beliefs during the first year teaching. Preservice teachers were interviewed before they graduated from the teacher education program and during their first-year teaching. Teacher educators were interviewed once. Participants believed that the most important factor causing MLD at the high school was students’ knowledge and beliefs. Teacher educators stated former unqualified teachers and preservice teachers stated curriculum and teachers’ workload as other causes of MLD. Participants suggested individual support and mixed ability grouping to reduce students’ MLD. The partial alignment of beliefs among the participants showed that preservice teachers might have developed some beliefs through the views and practices emphasized in the program. Preservice teachers elaborated more on MLD when they became teachers and stated similar beliefs with some stress on their MLD-related practices. Preservice teachers did not comment on how teachers’ knowledge and practices might influence students’ MLD in both times. Findings pointed that teacher education programs should focus on increasing preservice teachers’ awareness of how their knowledge, practices and beliefs about MLD might affect students to improve their future practices. It is possible that teachers’ beliefs about MLD could be related to their beliefs about the nature of mathematical knowledge and indicators of high performance in mathematics.

References

  • Beswick, K. (2007/2008). Influencing teachers’ beliefs about teaching mathematics for numeracy to students with mathematics learning difficulties. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, 9, 3-20.
  • Beswick, K. (2017). Raising attainment: What might we learn from teachers’ beliefs about their best and worst mathematics students? In C. Andra, D. Brunetto, E. Levenson, & P. Liljedahl (Eds.) Teaching and learning in mathematics classrooms (pp. 95-106). Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49232-2_10
  • Beswick, K. (2018). Systems perspectives on mathematics teachers’ beliefs: Illustrations from beliefs about students. In E. Bergqvist, M. Österholm, C. Granberg, & L. Sumpter (Eds.), Proceedings of the 42nd conference of the international group for the psychology of mathematics education (v.1, pp. 3-18). Umeå, Sweden: PME.
  • Carnine, D., Jitendra, A. K., & Silbert, J. (1997). A descriptive analysis of mathematics curricular materials from a pedagogical perspective: A case study of fractions. Remedial and Special Education, 18(2), 66-81. https://doi.org/10.1177/074193259701800201
  • Chinn, S. (2015). An overview. In S. Chinn (Ed.) The Routledge international handbook of dyscalculia and mathematical learning difficulties (pp. 1-17). London; New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315740713
  • Corbin, J., & Strauss, A. (2008). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781452230153
  • Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2018). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Cross Francis, D., Rapacki, L., & Eker, A. (2015). The individual, the context, and practice: A review of the research on teachers’ beliefs related to mathematics. In H. Fives, & M. Gregorie Gill (Eds.) International handbook of research on teachers’ beliefs (pp. 336-352). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • DeSimone, J. R., & Parmar, R. S. (2006a). Middle school mathematics teachers’ beliefs about inclusion of students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 21(2), 98-110. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-5826.2006.00210.x
  • DeSimone, J. R., & Parmar, R. S. (2006b). Issues and challenges for middle school mathematics teachers in inclusion classrooms. School Science and Mathematics, 106(8), 338-348. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1949-8594.2006.tb17754.x
  • Donche, V., & Van Petegem, P. (2011). Teacher educators' conceptions of learning to teach and related teaching strategies. Research Papers in Education, 26(2), 207-222. https://doi.org/10.1080/02671522.2011.561979
  • Felbrich, A., Müller, C., & Blömeke, S. (2008). Epistemological beliefs concerning the nature of mathematics among teacher educators and teacher education students in mathematics. ZDM Mathematics Education, 40(5), 763-776. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11858-008-0153-5
  • Fives, H., & Buehl, M. M. (2012). Spring cleaning for the “messy” construct of teachers’ beliefs: What are they? Which have been examined? What can they tell us? In K. R. Harris, S. Graham, & T. Urdan (Eds.) APA educational psychology handbook volume 2: Individual differences and cultural and contextual factors (pp. 471-499). Washington, DC: APA. https://doi.org/10.1037/13274-019
  • Flores, M. A., & Day, C., 2006. Contexts which shape and reshape new teachers’ identities: a multi perspective study. Teaching and Teacher Education, 22(2), 219-232. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2005.09.002
  • Furinghetti, F., & Pehkonen, E. (2002). Rethinking characterizations of beliefs. In G. C. Leder, E. Pehkonen, & G. Törner (Eds.), Beliefs: A hidden variable in mathematics education? (pp. 39-58). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-47958-3_3
  • Georgiou, S. N. (2008). Beliefs of experienced and novice teachers about achievement. Educational Psychology, 28(2), 119-131. https://doi.org/10.1080/01443410701468716
  • Goldin, G., Rösken, B., & Törner, G. (2009). Beliefs - no longer a hidden variable in mathematical teaching and learning process. In J. Maasz & W. Schlöglmann (Eds.), Beliefs and attitudes in mathematics education: New Research Result (pp. 1-18). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789087907235_002
  • Gomez, C. N., & Conner, A. (2020). Impact of Cooney, Shealy, and Arvold’s (1998) belief structures: A literature review and citation analysis. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 51(4), 468-503. https://doi.org/10.5951/jresematheduc-2020-0046
  • Green, T. F. (1971). The activities of teaching. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Haser, Ç. (2010). Learning to teach in the national curriculum context. European Journal of Teacher Education, 33, 289-302. https://doi.org/10.1080/02619761003713894
  • Haser, Ç., & Doğan, O. (2012). Preservice mathematics teachers’ belief systems. Journal of Education for Teaching: International Research and Pedagogy, 38, 261-274. https://doi.org/10.1080/02607476.2012.668336
  • Haser, Ç., & Star, J. R. (2009). Change in beliefs after first-year of teaching: The case of Turkish national curriculum context. International Journal of Educational Development, 29, 293-302. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2008.08.007
  • Jordan, N. C., & Levine, S. C. (2009). Socioeconomic variation, number competence and mathematics learning difficulties in young children. Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 15, 60-68. https://doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.46
  • Maaranen, K., Kynäslahti, H., Byman, R., Jyrhämä, R., & Sintonen, S. (2019). Teacher education matters: Finnish teacher educators’ concerns, beliefs, and values. European Journal of Teacher Education, 42(2), 211-227. https://doi.org/10.1080/02619768.2019.1566317
  • Maemeko, E. L., Nkengbeza, D., & Ntabi, M. L (2017). Teachers’ perceptions on the causes of poor academic performance of grade 12 learners in four selected schools in the Zambezi Region of Namibia. IJRDO-Journal of Educational Research, 2(4), 93-110.
  • Mazzocco, M. (2009). An introduction to the special issue: Pathways to mathematical learning difficulties and disabilities. Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 15(1), 1-3. https://doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.52
  • Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Ministry of Education (2009a). Mathematics syllabus ordinary level grades 11-12. Okahandja, NIED. Retrieved from http://www.nied.edu.na
  • Ministry of Education (2009b). Mathematics syllabus higher level grades 11-12. Okahandja, NIED. Retrieved from http://www.nied.edu.na
  • Ministry of Education (2010). The national curriculum for basic education. Okahandja, NIED. Retrieved from http://www.nied.edu.na
  • Ministry of Education, Arts and Culture. (2017). The SACMEQ IV project in Namibia: A study of the conditions of schooling and the quality of primary education in Namibia. Retrieved from http://www.sacmeq.org/
  • Morgan, P. L., Farkas, G., & Wu, Q. (2009). Five-year growth trajectories of kindergarten children with learning difficulties in mathematics. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 42(4), 306-321. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022219408331037
  • Nambira, G., Kapenda, L., Tjipueja G., & Sichombe, B. (2009). Performance of learners in mathematics at upper primary phase in Okahandja District: Examining reasons for low performances. Research Unit, Division Professional Development and Research, NIED Okahandja. Retrieved from http://www.nied.edu.na/documents/research/
  • Pajares, M. F. (1992). Teachers’ beliefs and educational research: Cleaning up a messy construct. Review of Educational Research, 62(3), 307-332. https://doi.org/10.3102/00346543062003307
  • Philipp, R. A. (2007). Mathematics teachers' beliefs and affect. In F. K. Lester (Ed.), Second handbook of research on mathematics teaching and learning (pp. 257-315). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
  • Raymond, A. M. (1997). Inconsistency between a beginning elementary school teacher’s mathematics beliefs and teaching practice. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 28(5), 550-577. https://doi.org/10.2307/749691
  • Reusser, K. (2000). Success and failure in school mathematics: Effects of instruction and school environment. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 9(2), 17-26. https://doi.org/10.1007/s007870070006
  • Richardson, V. (2003). Preservice teachers’ beliefs. In J. Raths, & A. C. McAninch (Eds.), Teacher beliefs and classroom performance: The impact of teacher education, volume 6: Advances in teacher education (pp. 1-22). Greenwich, CT: Information Age.
  • Scherer, P., Beswick, K., DeBlois, L., Healy, L., & Opitz, E. M. (2016). Assistance of students with mathematical learning difficulties: How can research support practice? ZDM Mathematics Education, 48(5), 633-649. https://doi.org/10.1007/s1185 8-016-0800-1
  • Soodak, L. C., & Podell, D. M. (1994). Teachers’ thinking about difficult-to-teach students. The Journal of Educational Research, 88(1), 44-51. https://doi.org/10.1080/00220671.1994.9944833
  • Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ). (2011). Trends in achievement levels of grade 6 learners in Namibia. SACMEQ Policy Brief Number 1 (September 2011). Retrieved from www.sacmeq.org
  • Thompson, A. G. (1992). Teachers' beliefs and conceptions: A synthesis of the research. In D. A. Grouws (Ed.), Handbook of the research on mathematics teaching and learning (pp. 127-146). New York: Macmillan.
  • Van Steenbrugge, H., Valcke, M., & Desoete, A. (2010). Mathematics learning difficulties in primary education: Teachers’ professional knowledge and the use of commercially available learning packages. Educational Studies, 36(1), 59-71. https://doi.org/10.1080/03055690903148639
  • Warren, A. (2019). Modelling effective instruction in the teacher education classroom. (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60911/
  • Zohar, A., Degani, A., & Vaaknin, E. (2001). Teachers’ beliefs about low achieving student and higher order thinking. Teaching and Teacher Education, 17(4), 469-485. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0742-051X(01)00007-5

License

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.