International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education Indexed in ESCI
Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes
APA
In-text citation: (Ruef et al., 2022)
Reference: Ruef, J. L., Willingham, C. J., & Ahearn, M. R. (2022). Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 17(2), em0681. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/11818
AMA
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Ruef JL, Willingham CJ, Ahearn MR. Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2022;17(2), em0681. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/11818
Chicago
In-text citation: (Ruef et al., 2022)
Reference: Ruef, Jennifer L., C. James Willingham, and Madeline R. Ahearn. "Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2022 17 no. 2 (2022): em0681. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/11818
Harvard
In-text citation: (Ruef et al., 2022)
Reference: Ruef, J. L., Willingham, C. J., and Ahearn, M. R. (2022). Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 17(2), em0681. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/11818
MLA
In-text citation: (Ruef et al., 2022)
Reference: Ruef, Jennifer L. et al. "Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 17, no. 2, 2022, em0681. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/11818
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Ruef JL, Willingham CJ, Ahearn MR. Math and Equity in the Time of COVID: Teaching Challenges and Successes. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2022;17(2):em0681. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/11818

Abstract

Background: This article describes teachers’ equity concerns related to teaching mathematics online as a result of the COVID-19 pivot to online/distance-based instruction. COVID-19 restrictions forced the creation of virtual education contexts that magnified existing equity issues related to access to technology and the challenges of providing inquiry-based, student-centered instruction.
Methods: This study took place under conditions promulgated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Nine teachers agreed to share their observations and experiences with the sudden switch to teaching mathematics online. Our methods included two online open response surveys. We qualitatively analyzed the responses from the surveys, coding for a priori, and emergent themes (Charmaz, 1995; Emerson et al., 2011).
Findings: The results indicate that our participants experienced concerns for students and families struggling to effectively engage with and access online education, and shared the practices and online tools they found most and least helpful in enacting equitable instruction.
Contribution: This work sheds light on how skilled and caring teachers leveraged prior experiences, collegial support, and technological tools to meet the challenges brought by the sudden transition to online mathematics pedagogy.

Disclosures

Declaration of Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest is declared by author(s).

Data sharing statement: Data supporting the findings and conclusions are available upon request from the corresponding author(s).

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