International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education
Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge
APA
In-text citation: (Feza-Piyose, 2012)
Reference: Feza-Piyose, N. (2012). Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 7(2), 62-79. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/270
AMA
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Feza-Piyose N. Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2012;7(2), 62-79. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/270
Chicago
In-text citation: (Feza-Piyose, 2012)
Reference: Feza-Piyose, Nosisi. "Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2012 7 no. 2 (2012): 62-79. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/270
Harvard
In-text citation: (Feza-Piyose, 2012)
Reference: Feza-Piyose, N. (2012). Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 7(2), pp. 62-79. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/270
MLA
In-text citation: (Feza-Piyose, 2012)
Reference: Feza-Piyose, Nosisi "Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 7, no. 2, 2012, pp. 62-79. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/270
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Feza-Piyose N. Language: A Cultural Capital for Conceptualizing Mathematics Knowledge. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2012;7(2):62-79. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/270

Abstract

Mathematics education in South Africa is in crisis. Students continue to perform at a lower level compared to other nations including those with low GPD compared to them. Two factors have been highlighted in research that impedes mathematics learning: teacher content knowledge and irrelevant teaching strategies. This study contributes to this literature by investigating five African (from a former White school) fifth grade students’ learning of length measurement with the aim of eliciting the students’ thinking levels by using a length learning trajectory. Clinical interviews and teaching experiments were employed for a comprehensive description of these students’ processes. The findings reveal that students’ mother tongue is a psychological tool that enriches their mathematics learning process, learning trajectory assisted in analysing students developmental processes with language and poor number development impeded abstraction in learning of length measurement concepts.

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