International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education
How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Ozaltun Celik A, Bukova Guzel E. How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2020;15(3), em0605. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/8461
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Ozaltun Celik & Bukova Guzel, 2020)
Reference: Ozaltun Celik, A., & Bukova Guzel, E. (2020). How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 15(3), em0605. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/8461
Chicago
In-text citation: (Ozaltun Celik and Bukova Guzel, 2020)
Reference: Ozaltun Celik, Aytug, and Esra Bukova Guzel. "How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2020 15 no. 3 (2020): em0605. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/8461
Harvard
In-text citation: (Ozaltun Celik and Bukova Guzel, 2020)
Reference: Ozaltun Celik, A., and Bukova Guzel, E. (2020). How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 15(3), em0605. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/8461
MLA
In-text citation: (Ozaltun Celik and Bukova Guzel, 2020)
Reference: Ozaltun Celik, Aytug et al. "How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 15, no. 3, 2020, em0605. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/8461
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Ozaltun Celik A, Bukova Guzel E. How to Improve A Mathematics Teacher’s Ways of Triggering and Considering Divergent Thoughts through Lesson Study. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2020;15(3):em0605. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/8461

Abstract

In this study, we aimed to examine a mathematics teacher’s actions related to triggering and considering divergent thoughts on the lessons before, during, and after the lesson study process. The participant was a mathematics teacher who participated in a lesson study design. We focused on his lessons before, during, and after the lesson study. The data were collected from the teacher’s lessons and these lessons were videotaped. The transcripts of these video records were analyzed in the context of triggering and considering divergent thoughts. The teacher’s actions were interpreted and the evidences were provided from the excerpts of the lessons. Throughout the lesson study, the teacher’s actions related to considering students’ thinking were improved and also varied. We suppose that this study will be a guide for mathematics teachers and teacher educators on triggering and considering divergent ideas.

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