International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 2016 - Volume 11 Issue 4, pp. 975-989
  • Published Online: 20 Jul 2016
  • Article Views: 1335 | Article Download: 1492
  • Open Access Full Text (PDF)
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Junqueira KE, Nolan KT. Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(4), 975-989.
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Junqueira & Nolan, 2016)
Reference: Junqueira, K. E., & Nolan, K. T. (2016). Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(4), 975-989.
Chicago
In-text citation: (Junqueira and Nolan, 2016)
Reference: Junqueira, Karen E., and Kathleen T. Nolan. "Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2016 11 no. 4 (2016): 975-989.
Harvard
In-text citation: (Junqueira and Nolan, 2016)
Reference: Junqueira, K. E., and Nolan, K. T. (2016). Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 11(4), pp. 975-989.
MLA
In-text citation: (Junqueira and Nolan, 2016)
Reference: Junqueira, Karen E. et al. "Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 11, no. 4, 2016, pp. 975-989.
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Junqueira KE, Nolan KT. Considering the roles of Mathematics specialist teachers in grade 6-8 classrooms. Int Elect J Math Ed. 2016;11(4):975-89.

Abstract

This paper is part of a larger study focusing on the perceptions of five different stakeholder groups about the role of a specialist teacher in the teaching of Mathematics in grades 6-9. Using a research questionnaire, the perceptions of 21 pre-service Mathematics teachers (13 Canadian and 8 South African) regarding whether they would consider becoming a Mathematics specialist teacher and what they considered to be the benefits and shortcomings of Mathematics specialist teachers, were obtained. It is on these perceptions (both the positive and negative ends of the spectrum relating to the use of Mathematics specialist teachers in grades 6-9) that the paper reports. The data indicate how our pre-service teachers think about their future careers as teachers and how they, even as students, take into consideration particular aspects that may benefit or hinder their teaching.

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