International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education Indexed in ESCI
Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.
APA
In-text citation: (Wang et al., 2008)
Reference: Wang, J., Lin, E., Tanase, M., & Sas, M. (2008). Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 3(1), 24-46. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/216
AMA
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Wang J, Lin E, Tanase M, Sas M. Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2008;3(1), 24-46. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/216
Chicago
In-text citation: (Wang et al., 2008)
Reference: Wang, Jian, Emily Lin, Madalina Tanase, and Midena Sas. "Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education 2008 3 no. 1 (2008): 24-46. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/216
Harvard
In-text citation: (Wang et al., 2008)
Reference: Wang, J., Lin, E., Tanase, M., and Sas, M. (2008). Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.. International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, 3(1), pp. 24-46. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/216
MLA
In-text citation: (Wang et al., 2008)
Reference: Wang, Jian et al. "Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.". International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 3, no. 1, 2008, pp. 24-46. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/216
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Wang J, Lin E, Tanase M, Sas M. Revisiting the Influence of Numerical Language Characteristics on Mathematics Achievement: Comparison among China, Romania, and U.S.. INT ELECT J MATH ED. 2008;3(1):24-46. https://doi.org/10.29333/iejme/216

Abstract

Eastern Asian students repeatedly outperform U.S. students in mathematics. Some suggest that number-naming languages consistent with the base-10 number system found in many Eastern Asian countries presumably contribute to their students’ better understanding of the base-10 system and consequential performance. Such language features do not exist in English or other Western languages. The current study tests this assumption by comparing base-10 knowledge of students in kindergarten and first-grade from China, Romania, and U.S. who have developed number-naming language abilities but received relatively little formal school instruction. It is expected that since Chinese number-naming is linguistically more transparent and consistent with the base-10 system, Chinese students should outperform both their Romanian and U.S. peers. Romanians should show intermediate performance between Chinese and U.S. students since Romanian language is somewhat transparent and consistent with a base-10 system while English numbernaming language is least consistent. However, the analysis of this study revealed that although Chinese children outperformed both Romanian and U.S. counterparts in accomplishing base-10 tasks, there were no significant differences between Romanian and U.S. children. This finding suggests that the extent to which number-naming language is linguistically transparent and consistent with the base-10 system may not necessarily align with the level of children’s understanding of the base-10 system and relevant mathematics performances.

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